Organisers

Abigail Tazzyman

alt510@york.ac.uk

In 2009 I graduated with a BA in history from The University of Oxford. I completed my Masters at the Centre for Women’s Studies at the University of York in 2011. In my MA I undertook comparative analysis of the work of Charcot (1877, 1881 and 1889) and Freud (1895) on hysteria and current NHS advice leaflets and websites on eating disorders.

In 2011 I commenced a PhD at the Centre for Women’s Studies at the University of York. My research focuses on female cultures of body management (the ways in which women consciously alter their bodies). Beginning from the premise that most women in current UK society are deeply concerned about their appearance, I am investigating how women manage their image of bodily self. Considering the popularity and pervasiveness of body modification among young UK women, my research investigates the motivation, explanations and understanding women have of the body modifications they undertake. Part of my research is to discover how this modification is perceived by the women who undertake it and how they place their actions within the wider spectrum of possible body modification. In regards to body modification, I am being inclusive of all methods, ranging from shaving, make-up and dieting, to surgery and much more. This research aims to provide an in depth understanding of women’s relationship to their body, the actions they take upon it and the implications of this relationship upon their social and cultural interactions, perceptions of self and their embodied experience.

Bridget Lockyer

bridget.lockyer@york.ac.uk

In 2009, I graduated with a BA in History from the University of Manchester. I completed a Masters at the Centre for Women’s Studies at the University of York in 2011. In October 2011, I started AHRC funded PhD research which will focus on women’s participation in the culture of charity work. My research will examine why women working within the voluntary sector have ‘chosen’ this type of employment, what they are motivated by and how the culture of charity work may be changing. It will consider the extent to which charity is perceived as ‘women’s work’.

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